Wednesday, March 13, 2013

Fishbowl #4: Fahrenheit 451 pgs. 93-130

Hi guys!  A tricky day to fishbowl, I know, but I'm excited to hear what you have to say.  I finished our last couple of assignments wondering if you're reading and what you're thinking about it.  Today is your day to show me.

To get credit as an outer circle member today--whether you are writing your response or blogging--you will need to support your thinking with quotes today.  This skill will also apply to questioning; provide the quote that led to that question OR support your answer to that question with textual evidence. I realize this will mean fewer posts, but hopefully those posts will be better informed and of better quality today.

Happy posting!

54 comments:

  1. After you read how Mildred just walks out of the house and doesn't say a word to Montag but instead is mumbling about how the family is gone. Has your opinion of who Mildred is as a person and what she cares about changed? How and Why?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes my opinion of Mildred has changed of who she is as a person because it seems that to me like she doesn't really care about Montag anymore or that she doesn't care about him. Also that it might be hard for her to show Montag what she is really feeling and she just couldn't handle it anymore so she decided to leave

      Delete
    2. I always thought mildred only concern was the parlor and she made it clear what I think mildred represents is doing what is easy right then and their as most of us do we don't do what is right we do what is easy.

      Delete
    3. Mildred seems extremely emotionally disconnected, she doesn't seem to love her husband at all. this is evident when Bradbury writes, " 'Will you bring me Aspirin ans water?' 'You've got to get up,' she said. 'It's noon. You've slept five hours later than usual.'(48). Mildred doesn't seem to care about her sick husband at all and wants him to take care of himself when he is sick.

      Delete
    4. My opinion of Mildred is starting to change, we are starting to be able to connect with her on an emotional level. Unlike the rest of the people in the society, she shows a glimpse of compassion and love in this scene. "Come on, let's be cheery, you turn the family on now. Go ahead Let's laugh and be happy now."(pg.101). This quote shows how Mildred is heart broken, she is just trying to contain it because she knows she can't show this emotion.

      Delete
  2. Do you think montag was justified in killing beate?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. First of all Kevin you didn't spell Beatty right. Back to the question. I don't think Montag was justified to kill Beatty because he didn't know anything about the books. Also Montag wasn't justified to burn his house in the first place. He was just being a cowered and thought that burning the house, Mildred, the dog and part of Faben. He is just a big cowered.

      Delete
    2. @Austin, It is spelled "coward". And I do not think it was justified because as Austin said, Beatty didnt know. I think much better things could have happened if more time was given.

      Delete
  3. It's hard to say weather he was truly justified. I believe that he killed Beatty out of anger and also to protect Faber. He feels a little responsible for bringing Faber to Beatty's attention when Beatty takes the green "bullet" out of his ear. Beatty himself says that not only have they caught Montag but will persue his friend (Faber).

    ReplyDelete
  4. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I think it's more like she's trying to deny it and run away from it, but it does show that she's actually starting to be effected by her real emotions.

      Delete
  5. How can Beatty not... not understand? He seems to be so, sadistic. He makes Montag burn down his OWN HOUSE all by himself and watches Montag do it as a Flying Monkey Robo-Dog growls at Montag menacingly. He doesn't seem to understand people at all. I mean I can understand not understanding ALL people, but not understanding a man you've worked with ten years and considered some what as a friend? Then want to hurt them if they decide to try something you don't like and change? How sadistic and narsasistic can a person be?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I think he understands Montag just fine, and that this is part of his scheme. Assuming that Montag is correct in his thought that Beatty wanted to die, Beatty didn't want Montag to have any problem at all killing him. He could easily be doing this to entice him. He appears to just be doing his job, but when he's standing right in front of Montag, he keeps taunting and harassing him, rather than surrendering to stall him long enough to get him arrested.

      Delete
  6. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

    ReplyDelete
  7. On page 116, Beatty tells Montag, "I want you to do this job all by your lonesome... not with kerosene and a match, but piece-work, with a flamethrower." Why might Beatty want this done with such raw precision, and by just Montag, rather than just make him watch and then arrest him?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Maybe to give him false hope of him being able to walk away from what he's done. Be able to live again with just a 1st warning, then arrest him and make him realize how horrible the thing he did was - which in my mind is Complete Baloney. Or as a 'good friend' is trying to make Montag 'right his own wrong' before taking him away.

      Delete
    2. I think Beatty made Montag do it in this manner so that he could really understand why, and show Montag that it needs to be done.

      Delete
    3. Making Montag watch it and then arrest him is just too easy. Forcing him to do this on his own with such destruction will get to him for sure. Beatty does not want him to have the easy way out.

      Delete
  8. On page 94, where it says "Montag reached inside the parlor wall and pulled the main switch." Why do you think Montag went from watching TV, to just walking up and unplugging it a few seconds later?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I think it kind of signifies change. I he starts to rebel and I think he is tired of everything and wants something new and different.

      Delete
    2. I believe Montag hates the technology, and the emotionless society it has created. He wanted their attention so badly, so he unplugged the T.V. to get it.

      Delete
    3. This is a really good question. I think Montag was a little freaked out when the book described peoples limbs being cut off and seeing bodies fly in the air during a car rally I guess you can call it. Plus he is defiantly unstable right now so seeing something like that might set him off.

      Delete
    4. This event signifies Montag wanting change. He is trying to get people to realize that technology is taking over all of their lives.

      Delete
  9. When is violence justified and is peaceful interactions always the answer.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Violence is only justified when the bad guy does something to threaten you or you families safety. Peaceful interactions is not always the answer.

      Delete
    2. Violence in my opinion is never justified, essential maybe to escape a bad situation in tact, but never justified as the right thing to do. Because the difference is that if something is justified then it means it wasn't done in vain, the act you did never came back to bite you in the but. Violence always comes back to bite you, whether by others or your own guilt. So Violence may be essential to WIN or ESCAPE, but it is never completely justified.

      Delete
    3. I agree with Jake. I think most of the time it should only be okay in self-defense

      Delete
    4. I think violence can be justified in some cases. During disagreements people try to make a peaceful solution, but end up going to war. If they couldnt work it out, it is justified.

      I cant find a quote from the book so I will used the last episode of The Walking Dead for my example.

      Delete
    5. Violence is justified in the case of when something needs to be done and that is the only logical way to achieve this. In the case of killing Beatty, that was justified, something had to be done finally. Peace is not always the answer. There are many cases in which peace does absolutely nothing.

      Delete
    6. To Paraphrase; Violence may at times be essential, but violence at no time is ever completely justifiable.

      Delete
    7. And I just said that sometimes violence IS ESSENTIAL, but that doesn't mean it will ever be completely justified by everyone. The bad guys don't see that as justice, they see it as an opportunity for vengence. And the person who does the violent act itself doesn't completely justify themselves of it, even if it was essential and in great intentions. Inside they don't feel that they've served justice, they feel like they've hurt someone - bad yes, but still a someone.

      Delete
  10. If everything seems all fine and dandy in their society. Books are banned and people to an extent live in a care free life. What do you think the war is about and who is fighting against who?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I think that the war is between the people of this society that Montag lives in and another society that is different from this one. Also that the war is about each side wanting to change the other side or that they don't want the other society to live

      Delete
    2. Earlier in the text, someone, I think it's Montag but I don't know for sure, said that they've started and lost two atomic wars since 1990. Judging by that, it seems to me that it doesn't matter who the United States is fighting right now, it just matters that it's the US against the world.

      Delete
    3. As of now we only know of this utopian like society and if they are having a war chances are that it i with another utopian society. The reason i say this is because a utopia may be completely different from another utopia. it could even have something to do with books.

      Delete
    4. I think in america their getting the benifits of all the other contries and they do all the hard work so they revulted

      Delete
  11. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

    ReplyDelete
  12. On page 114 montages wife leaves him, why do you think this is and was there anthing that indicated that she was going to leave?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. She is unhappy and tried to kill herself. She wants to blame her unhappiness on Montag rather then deal with her emotions. I believe Mildred thinks that she will be happy if she leaves Montag.

      Delete
    2. After Montag's explosion at the house reading the poetry to the women Mildred got distant and started to get further from Montag. Also all threee of the girls called the police on Montag

      Delete
    3. I don't think that there was any indication that she was going to leave Montag or even tell on him after she convers for him when he is going to read Dover Beach. Also i believe she left because she doesn't love Montag and because she cares more about her "family" then Montag. She expresses this by mumbling on about the family when she leaves and doesn't say a word to Montag.

      Delete
  13. Did Mildred get burned by Montag? I am confused on this part!!!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

      Delete
    2. No, she told the government that Montag had books and left him to take a taxi.

      Delete
    3. "Mildred came down the steps, running, one suitcase held with a dreamlike clenching rigidity in her fist, as a beetle-taxi hissed to the curb" (114).
      She gets a taxi and drives off. She's nowhere near the house when it gets burned down.

      Delete
    4. Either Ms. Lee is blocking the act of deleting comments or Blogger is messed up so I couldnt delete that. But after reading the page mentioned by David I remembered that she did live. I thought I read a quote that said she was dead. My bad.

      Delete
  14. On page 119 Bradbury writes," Beatty grinned his most charming grin. 'Well, that's one way to get an audience. Hold a gun on a man and force him to listen to your speech.' "(119). Do you think Beatty grinned and insulted Montag because he wanted to die? What is the purpose of this statement?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, I think that Beatty wanted to let Montag know that he wanted to die, instead of being scared and talking him out of killing him. He just wanted to get it over with and let Montag know that it was ok to kill him (Him being Beatty)

      Delete
    2. Easily so. Most people would surrender to stall Montag until the police arrived, but he pressed Montag to attack. If this wasn't a death wish, then he just doesn't think Montag has the guts.

      Delete
    3. I don't believe Beatty wanted to die. I grinned just to insult and aggravate Montag. The purpose of this statement is to show Beatty's true personalty.

      Delete
  15. On pg 101 Mildred is starting to show love and emotion after this tragic event. How do you think her future will be effected by this, will Mildred do anything drastic?

    ReplyDelete
  16. When montage kills his captain is there anything that justified him to do this?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. There was nothing else he could do but get arrested. If he ran, the Hound would kill him. If he didn't kill Beatty, he would get arrested. Since he just wants to make a change, even at the expense of himself, he takes the option that lets him carry on.

      Delete
  17. What do you think will happen to montag after he runs away from the murder scene

    ReplyDelete